Category Archives: Undergraduate Student

EPIC Spotlight: Caitlin Britt

It started as a high school project. The class worked toward getting clean drinking water to Ethiopia, and Caitlin Britt was in charge of fundraising. The students’ goal was met, the water was provided and the class received photographs showing the community benefiting from the clean water. “It made everything worthwhile, and it put a perspective on how we can help others,” she says.

Now a senior at the Sam M. Walton College of Business, Caitlin hopes to channel her altruism by either working for a nonprofit entity or in a corporation’s community engagement program.

Caitlin, who’s from Oklahoma City, is the first in her family to attend the University of Arkansas, and, unlike her parents and sister, is not choosing a career path in the medical profession. With an interest in numbers and history – Caitlin believes the business field incorporates both – she began researching schools that could provide her with the best education.

She was impressed that the Walton College is ranked among the best colleges by U.S. News & World Report. She also wanted to attend a large university that gave a small community feel. The Walton Honors Program provided the surroundings she was looking for, she says.

Majoring in both finance and economics with a communications minor, Caitlin says she feels the concentrations will enable her to pursue many opportunities, which are being made possible with help through the Honors College, Beta Gamma Sigma and Walton Fellowship scholarships. “Being able to have those tools – hopefully to serve the community – would be the ultimate goal,” she says.

This past summer, Caitlin worked as a revenue operations intern for nine weeks at ESPN’s print and media division in New York, where she held a variety of responsibilities. One in particular involved assisting with the sport network’s ESPY (Excellence in Sports Performance Yearly) website, for which she entered data and coordinated polling for the ESPY Awards. Caitlin was one of 70 interns selected in a pool of over 15,000 applicants, and the only one from Arkansas, she says.

While in New York, Caitlin also learned things not normally taught in the classroom: how to maneuver her way through the Big Apple and manage a personal budget. New York also offered great networking opportunities with its abundance in media and advertising, she says.

Caitlin says every undergraduate should get an internship in an unfamiliar city. “It does prepare you for the real world,” she says.

In 2012, she interned with Chesapeake Energy Corp., the nation’s second larger producer of natural gas.

Caitlin is active in Walton College’s many programs. She is co-leader of the Walton College Honors Student Executive Board, which is comprised of Walton Honors Program students who work toward building alumni relations and organize social and marketing activities for the college. She is also a member of the Pi Beta Phi sorority, where she serves as the new member coordinator.

She has also had opportunities to give to others. Last year, she studied abroad in Belize with other Walton College students. While there, her team helped create several business plans for community groups, distributed a micro-loan and built a playground.

All of this makes for challenging work, but she says it’s beneficial to the real world and she will carry that knowledge and encouragement by Walton College’s faculty, staff and students for years to come. “I have enjoyed being here so much with the relationships I have made,” she says.

 

EPIC Spotlight: Bunny Xu

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“There are a lot of corporations in Northwest Arkansas, and Walton College is one of the best business schools.”

One moment, Shicong “Bunny” Xu may be in a laboratory, working toward her biochemistry degree. A couple of hours later, she could be sitting in a classroom at the Sam M. Walton College of Business, listening to a lecture about supply and demand. This is where things start hopping.

She is an economics major, too.

Bunny says pursuing bachelor’s degrees from two different University of Arkansas colleges wasn’t intentional. When she first enrolled at the university, it was at the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences, where she indulged herself in science. Yet, she couldn’t ignore her surroundings. “There are a lot of corporations in Northwest Arkansas, and Walton College is one of the best business schools,” she says.

After speaking with Jason Adams, director of the Walton College honors program, Bunny realized she wanted to explore majoring in business as well.
“I found that I liked both, so why not stick with them?”

She says she’s still defining her career path, one that could include the business side of pharmaceuticals or working as a chemist in the nuclear power field, or maybe a combination of the two.

That path included coming to the United States as a 13-year-old with her mother from their hometown of Jilin, a snowy and sometimes bitterly cold province in China. Settling in Rogers, Bunny says the heat and humidity was a dramatic change. “But we love Arkansas now,” she says. “It’s a beautiful state.”

As a newcomer to the United States, Bunny spoke only Chinese and was required to take an English as a second language class her first semester of school. She also followed her mother’s advice of reading 50 pages of English text a day. Bunny caught on fast. After only one semester, Bunny scored high enough on her English proficiency exam to attend classes with the rest of the school.

Four years after moving to Rogers, she was accepted to the Arkansas School of Mathematics, Science and the Arts in Hot Springs. She lived in a dormitory and concentrated on math and science as a discipline, which, she says, was like a smaller version of a university.

In her junior year at the University of Arkansas, she was an Honors student and lists studying abroad in Japan as one of the high points of her college career. She says she hopes to study overseas again, this time in India.

Meanwhile, Bunny is focusing energy on her two honors theses – one involving protein participation under the guidance of biochemistry associate professor Paul Adams. She’s still working out the details for her Walton College thesis.

Bunny is also active in several campus chapter organizations, including the National Retail Federation Student Association, which is sponsored by Walton College’s Center for Retailing Excellence, Circle K International, the Alpha Lambda Delta National Honor Society and the Chemistry Club.

She says she learned to manage her time effectively in high school and usually devotes three to five hours daily to her studies. She says she turns off her cellphone and all social networks on her computer when doing her schoolwork, and she is usually in bed by 11 p.m. and gets up each day at 7 a.m. “Because I get enough sleep, it helps me concentrate better,” she says.

Bunny is also a supplemental instruction leader for economics professor Charles Britton’s macroeconomics class. Each week, she and about 45 students review the previous lesson in her role as both tutor and adviser. “I’ve been in those students’ shoes before,” she says. “I can help them out.”

As for her nickname, she says she initially wanted her adopted American name to be “Bonnie.” This was before she mastered her English, and many interpreted her to say “Bunny,” instead. “I just kind of got stuck there,” she says. “I like it.”

EPIC Spotlight: Brian McCaster

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“You have to ask yourself, ‘What do I want to learn from this?’”

When Brian McCaster was in high school, he spent 11 months in Paraguay as an exchange student. The experience opened his eyes to issues beyond his central Arkansas home near Conway, especially when Paraguayans would ask him questions about the United States’ government and economics.

This past summer, Brian returned to South America, this time to Brazil in the Study Abroad program sponsored by the Sam M. Walton College of Business. He and other students, through the guidance of Walton College economics professor Andrew Horowitz, met with business experts, including those with supply chain management and logistics backgrounds.

Brian plans to graduate in May 2012 with a degree in international business management and a minor in Spanish. He says his classes have been challenging but in a good way.

“Whenever you take those classes, you have to be focused,” Brian says. “You have to ask yourself, ‘What do I want to learn from this?’”

Though this background would make him suited for a career in international business, Brian says it has prepared him for something else: working with high school students and college freshmen. He already has experience in the area. For the past three years, Brian has served as a resident assistant at Maple Hill South dormitory, lending an ear to new students as they adjust to their independence.

Brian says he had planned to enroll in graduate school immediately after earning his bachelor’s degree. A phone call changed everything. A recruiter with Teach for America, a program where leaders commit two years to teaching children in low-income communities across the country, asked Brian to join the organization.

Brian was reluctant at first. “But I got on the phone with this guy, and everything made sense,” he says.

Brian says the program will help him test his strengths before he moves on to graduate school later.

Reaching out to the community’s needs is also Brian’s passion. He has participated with Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE), an international nonprofit organization that has a Walton College chapter. His involvement has included replacing light bulbs with compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) in low-income housing and working with older people in various capacities from teaching them how to use the Internet to helping build a community garden at the Fayetteville Senior Activity and Wellness Center.

Raised by his grandparents, Brian says his business classes have made him think about his grandfather, who owned a concrete business before retiring. Growing up, he says, he never thought about all of the business decisions his grandfather surely made. Brian says his experience at Walton College gives him a newfound respect for the business and the man, and he now looks to him as a crucial source of guidance.

Brian also seeks guidance at Walton College. Naturally curious, he sometimes visits different professors during their office hours to find out their passions and motivations.

“You can learn something from anybody,” Brian says. “No matter who it is, you can learn something.”

EPIC Spotlight: Audrey Davidson

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The 10-key calculator with a small, paper roll fascinated Audrey Davidson as a child. She watched her mother, a real estate accountant, punch the buttons, causing the calculator to print out numbers as the spool turned. Sometimes, Audrey punched the buttons herself, pretending she was grown up. Add her father to the equation, the chief financial officer of his engineering firm, and it almost seemed inevitable.

Audrey was an accountant in the making.

Several years later, while a high school junior in Webb City, Mo., Audrey took an accounting class. She enjoyed it so much, a year later she became her accounting teacher’s assistant. These experiences stayed with her as she began looking for a college to attend. One university made quite an impression, especially since it is near major corporations with a global impact. “The business school is so well known,” she says. There was also the lure of the Integrated Master of Accountancy (IMAcc) program, a five-year plan that enables students to become certified public accountants.

Her choice: the Sam M. Walton College of Business at the University of Arkansas.

Now a senior, Audrey has a summer accounting internship lined up at PricewaterhouseCoopers’ Springdale location. The corporation, with headquarters in London, offers various accounting services globally. She says networking through the University of Arkansas chapter of Beta Alpha Psi, an honorary organization for finance honor students and professionals, led to the internship. When she graduates from the IMAcc program and gets her CPA, she says she hopes to return to PricewaterhouseCoopers as a staff accountant.

Audrey says her experiences at Walton College have convinced her she’s on the right path. “All of those classes just instilled in me that I want to do accounting more,” she says.

Her education has also involved traveling globally. During summer break in 2010, she visited Spain where she took classes and lived in a home where nobody spoke English. She says this provided an excellent opportunity to practice her Spanish-speaking skills.

Last summer, she traveled to Belize with a business team from the Walton College where she took an active role in the community by creating a brochure for the city of Dangriga, as well as a cookbook of traditional Belizean foods for a nonprofit women’s cooperative. Audrey and the team also put some muscle work into building a public park, often in very hot conditions.

“We built it mainly out of tires and material we found around town,” she says. “The kids and people of all ages loved it.”

As a Walton College student, Audrey is secretary for Beta Alpha Psi, with duties that include reporting membership information to the association’s national headquarters, and serves as a Walton College Student Ambassador, where she gives tours to prospective business students. She is also a student representative for Becker Professional Education, which conducts CPA exam reviews, and does promotional work such as hanging posters and sending out e-mails on the corporation’s behalf. In addition, Audrey is a member of the Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority.

Away from the university, Audrey has volunteered with the Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) Association, which represents abused and neglected children in the courtroom and elsewhere.

Her college experiences will have a lasting impression when she begins her career, she says.

“The opportunities that we have here as students are endless,” she says.

EPIC Spotlight: Ashleigh Toatley

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Over a four-year span, senior Ashleigh Toatley has gone from being unsure of what field to get into to becoming a leader in her department.
“From a young age, I knew I wanted to major in business, but I wasn’t sure of which specific field,” Toatley said. “Entering into college my objective was to major in a field that was growing and in demand. When I met with Barbara Lofton my freshman year, she told me about this major (called) Transportation and Logistics.”

Since deciding upon her focus, Toatley has plunged headfirst into the world of Transportation and Logistics through her courses in Walton College and extracurricular activities. She is a member of Women in Logistics and has worked with the Supply Chain Management Research Center, which led to her involvement in the University of Arkansas’ Operation Stimulus team.

While working at the Supply Chain Management Research Center in 2008, Toatley organized a research project outlining how interstate commerce trucking regulations vary from state to state across the 48 lower states.

“Through working with Dr. Terry Tremwel, I learned the importance of staying current about what is going on today in the transportation industry as technology and regulations are always changing,” Toatley said. “And though this was the hardest project I’ve ever worked on in my life, it was the most rewarding.”
Toatley made a great impression on the faculty at the research center during her time there.

“We certainly believe that Ashleigh is a talented student leader, but she also excels in research and presentation skills,” said Jim Crowell, director of the Supply Chain Management Research Center. “She displays attention to details and persistence in quality research.”

Crowell and his colleagues were so enthusiastic about Toatley’s performance on the project that they invited her to present her research at a General Electric Conference in Greenville, South Carolina, in front of 200 presidents and vice presidents of major trucking companies.

“It was great to see people interested in what I found so fascinating,” Toatley said.

In addition to being invited to the conference in Greenville, Toatley was also appointed to Walton College’s Operation Stimulus team as a junior. Operation Stimulus is a five-member undergraduate debate team that competes in a national conference in Denver against representatives from 13 other schools with top Transportation and Logistics programs. In the competition, teams are presented with a problem and must use analysis, qualitative and quantitative models, and research to develop the most practical solution.

“(Operation Stimulus) is a great experience because you are among some of the greatest schools in the nation, like Ohio State and Michigan State,” Toatley said. “It’s a great feeling to know that you are representing the University of Arkansas, and you want to apply everything you’ve learned to the case you’re given. It’s also great to work as a team with other classmates because so many minds working together can create extremely creative solutions to problems.”

Toatley will lead the 2010 Operation Stimulus team in the upcoming conference on January 28-30.

Throughout her college experience, Toatley said that Walton College’s faculty has been an asset to her development.

“Having faculty who care about your college career and have great advice to give during challenging situations is the best aspect of the Walton College and the U of A,” Toatley said. “It’s true that you’re not `just a number’ at the U of A. Everything that I’ve learned in the classroom has allowed me to hold conversations with executive professionals in (Transportation and Logistics).”

Toatley has applied her knowledge of the field outside of Walton College. She worked for Tyson Foods for about a year and a half, interning in both the Transportation and Marketing departments.

“It was a great experience (interning in both departments) because I was able to see them operate on a day-to-day basis within such a large corporation,” Toatley said.

Toatley recently accepted an internship at J.B. Hunt, which she said she is looking forward to because it will allow her to continue to apply what she learned in the classroom in the workforce.

After graduation, Toatley said she hopes to join a growing and large corporation, or perhaps to apply to the University of Arkansas’ MBA program.

“So far, I’ve had the opportunity to interview with great companies in Somers, New York, and Omaha, Nebraska,” Toatley said. “Although it has become challenging to manage school, traveling, and work I have enjoyed every minute of the journey as I prepare for the big transition from school to the workforce.”

EPIC Spotlight: Amanda Dooly

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Dancing is Amanda Dooly’s passion. Growing up in Fort Smith, she spent long hours studying ballet as well as contemporary dance styles. Her skills are so strong, Texas Christian University offered her a spot in the School for Classical and Contemporary Dance.

Although Amanda says she had envisioned a career in the arts, by the end of her senior year at Southside High School, she was thinking about other occupations. Her father, treasurer at Baldor Electric Co., played a big role in her decision to pursue a business degree, especially after she traveled with him on a business trip to New York. While there, she and her father met with the global investment bank BNP Paribas. The discussions she had with the directors and vice presidents intrigued her.

When it came time to choose a college, the University of Arkansas, only about an hour north from her hometown, seemed like the logical choice. “I decided to come here because it’s closer to home,” she says. “Family is big to me.”

Amanda says when she first enrolled as a Sam M. Walton College of Business honor student, she majored in international business with Spanish as her focus language. During her junior year, she changed her major to accounting and continued to take Spanish courses in order to complete a minor.

Little did Amanda know that a high school meeting with BNP Paribas would lead her to last summer’s internship with the company. She lived in New York, and her title with BNP Paribas was corporate acquisition finance summer analyst. She analyzed financial data regarding proposed corporate takeovers, acquisitions and mergers.

Amanda says her internship and business courses all point to a bright future. “All of the resources at the Walton College prepare you for a career after graduation,” she says.

Participating in the Walton College Ambassador program allows Amanda to represent the college in different ways, such as giving tours to prospective students.

This doesn’t mean she’s left dancing behind. She is able to choreograph pieces for the Western Arkansas Ballet Company in Fort Smith and the Southside High School Dixie Belles. She also serves on the board of directors of the Dance Coalition in Northwest Arkansas and has even provided her dancing skills to the University of Arkansas. Last year she was Pork Chop, the smallest of the university’s uniformed mascots, and performed at all of the home football, basketball and volleyball games as well as gymnastics meets. Amanda’s family also offers a scholarship in her name through the Western Arkansas Ballet Company to enable aspiring choreographers to attend a summer choreography intensive. As a member of the Zeta Tau Alpha sorority, she has served as fraternity educator and step show chair and volunteers with Race for the Cure each spring.

This May, Amanda will continue her education through the Integrated Master of Accountancy (IMAcc) program, a five-year Walton College program where, upon completion in 2013, Amanda will receive bachelor’s and master’s degrees and be eligible to take the certified public accountant exam.

“I have been very blessed to have so many unique and inspiring opportunities available to me throughout my college career,” Amanda says. “I would encourage other students to take advantage of any opportunity they are presented with from the minute they step on campus.”

EPIC Spotlight: Alice McMillan

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Alice McMillan is determined to make the most out of her time at the University of Arkansas. The Kansas City native is a junior in the Sam M. Walton College of Business and is pursuing a degree in marketing with a minor in Spanish. In addition to her studies, McMillan participates in several programs and organizations on campus.

A number of factors contributed to her decision to attend the University of Arkansas. “I was looking for an opportunity to get out of [Missouri]. I wanted to experience something that I hadn’t gotten the chance to experience before. This school is one of the most affordable and the best deal at the same time,” McMillan said. She received the Silas Hunt scholarship, which not only helps pay for tuition and fees, but also waives her out-of-state tuition. “Also, the culture down here was nice. It was really friendly and I liked the vibe I got when I came for a campus visit. It’s a big school; but at the same time, it’s very intimate. I like that,” she said. “I also knew how good the Walton College was. It’s ranked very high and is one of the top business schools, and that’s what I was really interested in.” McMillan said she shares many of the qualities that tend to define business majors. “It’s just how my brain works. I’m really competitive, innovative, and a perfectionist—a kind of type A personality, which is stereotypically what a lot of business students are,” she said.

The summer before McMillan’s freshman year, she had a municipal finance internship in Kansas City. “The biggest project was the city’s annual comprehensive financial report. I worked with the head financial officer. I also worked with some auditors and was responsible for clerical stuff.” She said the benefits of this experience were clear from the beginning. “It showed me what I could do with my degree and how some of the different majors can relate to one another. It also showed me a lot about how things work after college—basically, how adults operate.”

When she isn’t in class, McMillan is taking part in extracurricular activities. One of her favorite programs is the Spring International Conversation Partners Program. “I get to basically teach English to our international students and welcome them when they get here,” she said. “I’ve worked with people from Japan, Brazil, Korea and all kinds of different places. If they have a test or presentation, I’ll help them study or I’ll listen to them and help them with their presentation skills. My job also is to get them acclimated to the campus and America in general.”

She also mentors new business students through the Freshmen Business Connections program. “Every FBC teacher has a student assistant and my job is to facilitate discussion for them. We talk about issues that freshmen face and also how to be successful in the business school. I helped with advising and was also responsible for planning FBC’s social functions for the year,” she said.

As a Connections mentor, McMillan helps underrepresented or minority students understand and deal with the issues they face that may not have been addressed at new student orientation.

McMillan is a Silas Hunt mentor and member of the National Association of Black Accountants. She also participates in the Center for Retailing Excellence mentoring program and is mentored by Saatchi and Saatchi X. She was chosen to take part in the Razorback Sports Marketing Internship Program in summer 2010 and the 2010-2011 school year. She will also begin working with SAKE in the fall and said she is really looking forward to the experience.

McMillan’s activities are not contained to the University of Arkansas campus. In fact, some of them take place thousands of miles from Fayetteville. In 2009, McMillan attended the presidential inauguration of Barack Obama with a select group of students; and, in summer 2010, she will be travelling to Africa on the African American Studies department’s inaugural trip to Ghana. “I chose this program because [professors] approached me about it and told me they wanted me to come and be in it. Also, it’s my motherland. It’s a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to go where you originated from. I had several trips I was choosing from, like Italy and Mexico, but I figured I would have an easier time getting back to those places than getting to Africa.” McMillan said she is very excited for this travel opportunity.

She’s enjoying the present, but she’s still making plans for the future. If McMillan could have her dream job, she would work in international marketing. “I know it’ll take me a while to get to it, but I’d like to do product development and market research in another country. I’d like to utilize my Spanish [minor] somewhere like Costa Rica or Guatemala and do research or have a product there.”

McMillan said more education is likely in her future. “I think I want to go to graduate school-maybe stay at the Walton College for a fifth year and get my MBA, and then go out and look for a job.”

EPIC Spotlight: Alex Nunn

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“I want to make an impact beyond where I’m working.”

Alex Nunn perks up when a law case is discussed in his classes at the Sam M. Walton College of Business. If there’s a topic that inspires debate among the students, even better. The combination has led to a revelation: He should become a corporate lawyer.

Hailing from Dallas, Alex will graduate in May with finance and accounting degrees and will head off to law school, either at Vanderbilt or Harvard. He was accepted to both. He understands what it takes to be a successful corporate lawyer. “You need a good foundation and understanding of how business works,” he says.

He says his father, who works in corporate law, influenced his career decision. Plus, Alex has a natural interest in the profession. “I have always been fascinated by how lawyers and courts can shift markets,” he says.

But first, he’s getting married. Walton College isn’t only a place for him to map out his career. It’s also where he found his soul mate. In July, he will wed Walton College senior Megan Dunham, who is majoring in supply chain management. The two met as sophomores in their Markets and Consumers class, he says.

Living in Texas, and with no immediate family members having attended the University of Arkansas, Alex say his longtime friend, Jon Reene, now a senior at Walton College, persuaded him to attend school here. Alex began researching the University of Arkansas. “I was reading about the Walton College, and I never knew it had such a prestigious alumni base,” he says. When he toured the campus and Fayetteville, he was pleased. “Beyond the academic opportunities here, it’s a great environment to be in,” Alex says.

Alex is a founding member of the Walton College Honors Student Executive Board, which is comprised of 16 honor students who work toward building alumni relations and organize social and marketing activities for the college. He is a member of the University of Arkansas chapter of Beta Gamma Sigma, an international business honors society, and has served as an Honors College Ambassador. Alex also studied abroad in Rome.

Once he graduates from law school, Alex says he hopes to gain a judicial clerkship, which gives clerks access not only to the judge’s chambers but behind-the-scenes knowledge into the judicial process. Ideally, Alex says he would like a clerkship to the United States Supreme Court.

He says he hopes to eventually work for a socially conscious law firm or corporation. “I want to make an impact beyond where I’m working,” he says. “I want to touch the community.” (Posted April 2013)

EPIC Spotlight: Addison Scott

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“All of the opportunities that have been afforded to me here are amazing.”

Addison Scott resisted the calling to be an accountant. It was the profession of her parents, and she wanted to blaze a different trail. That is, until she took an accounting class.

And liked it.

“I got into business school and discovered it was the best decision I’ve ever made,” she says.

Now in her junior year at the Sam M. Walton College of Business, Addison is keeping a busy schedule with three – yes, three – majors. She is working on an international business degree with an economics concentration and a minor in French and has a double major in finance and accounting.

Taking on heavy loads is nothing new to Addison. As a student at Little Rock Central High School, she was enrolled in several advance placement courses, for which she was able to earn college credit, placing her as a sophomore at the University of Arkansas immediately after high school graduation.

Addison says that she first considered pursuing a business career in high school when she found her economics class resonated with her. “The cause and effect nature of the field appealed to me,” she says.

Then, there was finance, which appeals to her banking interest while economics enhances it.

She says she didn’t seriously consider attending the University of Arkansas until she toured the campus. When she did, she says she “fell in love” and was met by a welcoming staff and faculty. “That’s something you don’t really get at other schools,” she says.

During her first year at Walton College, Addison joined the university chapter of Students In Free Enterprise (SIFE), which has since changed its name to Enactus, a global, nonprofit organization that does community service by teaching the principles of free enterprise. She says she was project leader for the GreeNWAy Initiative, which assists Fayetteville Chamber of Commerce member organizations with implementing ways to make their businesses green and sustainable.

Addison says she stepped down from her SIFE leadership to study abroad in Toulouse, France, in Spring 2012. While at the Toulouse Business School, she studied master’s level programs with a focus on international management. She says her class was composed of both French and international students, with each course a week long. She says she found working with diverse groups to be very rewarding. “I think that’s the most beneficial thing I reaped from traveling abroad,” she says.

Her student activities include serving as a founding member and various committee chair positions of the Walton College Honors Student Executive Board with her role transitioning to a leadership position this spring. Addison is also the event coordinator for the newly formed International Business Club, which serves as a welcoming team to international students new to Walton College and helps Walton College students explore international opportunities, such as studying abroad. In addition, she is a University of Arkansas Student Ambassador, a volunteer program with activities that include giving prospective students tours on campus and aiding in the admissions process.

During the winter break of the 2011-2012 school year, Addison received real-world experience when she interned in the accounting office of Windstream Communications, a voice and data network provider in Little Rock. Addison says after her spring 2013 semester, she will intern in the internal audit department at Walmart’s Bentonville headquarters.

There’s still school as well. Addison says she plans to apply for Walton College’s Integrated Master of Accountancy (IMAcc) program, a five-year plan that enables students to become certified public accountants. Upon completion, she says she hopes to work in the private sector but would like to eventually play a role in public policy and economic development.

She says Walton College is helping make her dreams possible. “All of the opportunities that have been afforded to me here are amazing,” she says.