Category Archives: Undergraduate Student

Supply Chain Management Honor Society Inducts New Members

Sigma Chi Mu Tau, the Supply Chain Management Honor Society founded by the Department of Supply Chain Management at the Sam M. Walton College of Business in 2016, has inducted 14 members into its second class.

The University of Arkansas initiates are:

Seniors: Chu Chen, Katherine Gavin, Alissa Gardner, Macy Roe and Sarah McGuire.

Juniors: Kate Barger, Shane Canady, Garrison Coker, Ryan Edwards, Emma Fields, Taylor Hunt, Cristina Perez-Espinoza, Sadie Wallner and Ryan Walter.

The two co-presidents, chosen from the junior class, are Hunt and McGregor.

Membership is extended to supply chain management juniors and seniors as well as educators and professionals who have shown dedication and contributions to the supply chain management profession. Sigma Chi Mu Tau recognizes academic merit and encourages leadership, ethical behavior and commitment to high standards in the pursuit of supply chain management excellence.

Membership is open to students majoring in supply chain management who have taken at least one upper level supply chain course. Invitations are sent to students based on rank in class. Juniors must rank in the top 10 percent of their class and seniors must ranking in the top 20 percent of their class.

Invitations are extended once during a student’s academic career.

The organization is accepting university memberships as well for future chapters. Contact faculty adviser Carole Shook at shook@uark.edu for more information.

Enactus Partners with the American Legion to Support Community Programs

Enactus, a student-led entrepreneurial organization at the Sam M. Walton College of Business at the University of Arkansas, is partnering with the Shelton Tucker Craft American Legion Post #27 in Fayetteville to remodel the facility, revitalize its business operations and increase its membership.

The Enactus team will develop a sustainable business model to allow American Legion members to refocus on community outreach and education. The post operates a volunteer-staffed bar and restaurant to fund outreach and social programs that educate young people about democracy and military service and provide veterans and their families with social opportunities, career skills and other support.

The Enactus team is also developing a membership and marketing campaign to recruit members from the Gulf War, Iraqi Freedom, Desert Storm and Afghanistan conflicts to increase membership at the post. The student team created a Go Fund Me site  to support these initiatives. Enactus plans to host an official grand reopening of the post in July 2019 to coincide with the Post’s centennial celebration.

“I was inspired by the members of this American Legion Post,” said Pamela Styles, associate director of outreach for the Center for Retailing Excellence and Walton Fellow for the University of Arkansas Enactus team. “The Enactus students and I were privileged to attend their November membership meeting. I was in awe of their tremendous sense of duty to this country and to their brothers in arms. Being a witness to the reverence with which they conducted the MIA ceremony dedicated to those still missing but not forgotten, the pledge of allegiance, a prayer, and the reading of the preamble to the Constitution touched me deeply. These men and women have given the ultimate in service and continue to serve the community in which they live.”

About the Shelton Tucker Craft American Legion Post #27: The Shelton Tucker Craft American Legion Post 27 was chartered July 31, 1919. Its name honors three local servicemen, Martin Lynn Shelton, William Marion Tucker and Clarence B. Craft. The post conducts numerous programs that serve the community and fellow veterans and their families. It supports more youth attendance to American Legion Boys State and American Legion Auxiliary Girls State, which highlight government and leadership skills, each year than any other post in Arkansas.

About the Center for Retailing Excellence: The Center for Retailing Excellence was established in the Walton College in 1998 with a portion of the $50 million endowment from the Walton Family Charitable Support Foundation. The center focuses on developing future leaders and serves as a bridge between academics and the retail industry.

Hog Ride Offering Students Alternative Travel Plan

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Byron Alley

A speeding ticket after freshman orientation – one that raised the cost of his car trip from about $70 to nearly $300 — planted the idea with Byron Alley that there had to be a better way to and from the Fayetteville campus of the University of Arkansas for students who live in Texas. Continue reading Hog Ride Offering Students Alternative Travel Plan

Information Technology Students Receive Insight from Industry Executives

The Information Technology Research Institute, an outreach center at the Sam M. Walton College of Business, hosted executive forums on Sept. 14-15 for high school and college students interested in the field of information technology.

Information technology executives from Tyson Foods Inc., the state of Arkansas’ Department of Information Systems, Walmart, Arvest Bank Operations, Acxiom, ConocoPhillips, FedEx, J.B. Hunt Transport Services, Inc., Arkansas BlueCross BlueShield, Teradata and Movista were on hand to answer questions about appropriate academic classes, desired skills and information technology trends and to offer career tips.

Rajiv Sabherwal moderates the Executive Forum.
Rajiv Sabherwal, chair of the information systems department, moderated the technology panel while Eric Bradford, managing director of ITRI, managed the event.

More than 250 high school students from across Arkansas attended the forum on Sept. 15. Their questions addressed issues ranging from Windows 10 deployment, data breaches, hiring tips and developing information technology talent. Panelists provided multiple responses, each from their unique perspective. View this event at http://bit.ly/2dtpGAk. The forum was moderated by Rajiv Sabherwal, chair of the Walton College Department of Information Systems.

Some 80 University of Arkansas students attended the forum on Sept. 14.  Susan Bristow, clinical assistant professor of the information systems department, moderated the question and answer session. Students inquired about academic studies, interview preparation and career options. After responding to questions, members of the panel talked to students individually.

The Information Technology Research Institute is committed to promoting student interest in the study of information technology and facilitating the interaction between potential employees and its board of advisers. The executive forums for high school students and college students are just two events the institute hosts to accomplish this goal.

To learn more about the Information Technology Research Institute, visit itri.uark.edu.

Institute Hosts IT Executive Forum for Students

The Information Technology Research Institute will present an IT Executive Forum for college students Wednesday, Sept. 14, at 3 p.m. in the Donald W. Reynolds Center for Enterprise Development auditorium at the Sam M. Walton College of Business.

During the event, students can ask seasoned information technology professionals questions regarding careers, academic guidance and skills needed in the field of technology. Executives from Walmart, J.B. Hunt Transport Services, Inc., Tyson Foods, Acxiom, FedEx, Hewlett Packard and more will be on hand to share their experience and advice regarding information technology.

The event is open to all University of Arkansas students.

Seating is limited to 300 students. Register today. For more information, visit the Information Technology Research Institute.

Students Help Consumers Discover Durable

American explorers Lewis and Clark, Teddy Roosevelt and Neil Armstrong all “discovered durable” … well, among other notable things. While each may have their unique place in history, they now feature in a student-created advertising campaign, courtesy of Anne Velliquette’s Integrated Marketing Communications class at the Sam M. Walton College of Business.

In spring 2016, Velliquette directed student teams to create an ad campaign focusing on backpack manufacturer Piltdown Outdoor Company of Springdale. To give the students a hands-on project with a real company, the clinical assistant professor invited local entrepreneur Trey Ansen to introduce his backpacks to students and enlist their ideas for an ad campaign.

Piltdown3“This is such a valuable hands-on experience for the students who form small ad agencies to pitch their ideas to a real client,” Velliquette said. “They get to experience what it is like to work with a client, to hear their needs and desires and to then work as an account manager and creative team to deliver an integrated creative ad campaign that delivers the right brand positioning and the right message for the target market the client wishes to engage. “

Teams were to deliver three components for the project:

  1. A written creative brief
  2. An ad campaign with three visuals
  3. An oral presentation to the client

Walton senior Ann “AC” Hansen was a member of the winning team, along with Davis Trice, Austin Allen, Grace Ann Lile and Esther Udouj. This group of students named their agency Boulder Branding.

“We thought of the name Boulder Branding because we liked the idea of having a brand that was strong (like a boulder) and daring,” Hansen said. “Thus, the name Boulder was born.”

Piltdown1Piltdown’s two main promises to its customers are that its backpacks are made to last and are designed and assembled in the United States. The campaigns needed to reflect the product’s rugged durability and its American roots.

“We tried to give the students as much freedom as possible,” said Ansen, founder and chief executive officer for Piltdown. “We told them the story of our company then asked them to put together a social media campaign that tells that same story to our customers.”

The Boulder Branding team listened to Ansen, brainstormed ideas, researched and then designed an ad campaign using American explorers.

“I knew that Trey wanted to get across that his product was all American,” Hansen said. “He wanted to show that his brand could be trusted until the end. With those thoughts in mind, we thought up famous American pioneers and pasted the packs on them. This delivered humor and showed the true American spirit of Piltdown.”

Piltdown2“The campaigns were unbelievable,” Ansen said. “The students were in our target market and they knew exactly how they’d want to be talked to. They had the right voice and attitude and came up with several ideas that none of our professionals had thought of.”

“This project taught me a lot more about the importance of knowing your brand and not straying from it,” Hansen said. “It taught me that creativity is important and should be leveraged. I learned that taking risks is good and necessary.”